The pursuit of happiness: #10 and # 11 on my bucket list

Bloomberg Moves To Ban Sugary Drinks In NYC Restaurants And Movie Theaters

In the pursuit of creating the ultimate bucket list I have decided to tackle number ten and eleven on the list, which are essentially the same things. Number ten on my bucket list is to reduce my sugar intake and number eleven on my bucket list is to quit drinking all forms of soda.

Sugar in my household is abundant, my mother is a self proclaim sugar addict, whose teeth are rotten beyond repair. Growing up sugar was a source of comfort to her, although she does not say why that is. I know now that whenever me and brother are in the grocery line asking to take a couple of candy bars off the shelf of the store she, will not hesitate to say yes to us. And if she does say no to us, that is only because she will later take us to our local dollar store where we can essentially get more for a dollar.

We all know that sugar and soda together is America’s public enemy number one. It is hard to escape it’s addictive claws, the simple fact that it tastes extremely good, but I know that I must give them up as a lifestyle change. So to sugar and soda, you just made a life-long enemy.candy

candy2

The pursuit of happiness

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”
― Mark Twain

We all are promised the certainty of death, It is a well known fact that all creatures on planet Earth will head to a shallow grave; but we all travel different paths in order to reach our destiny. A bucket list is not merely a list of goals to accomplish before we die, because it is not know to us when the grim reaper will come. Will he come an hour from now, tomorrow, or ten years from now. A bucket list is list of goals to accomplish in the moment, because the next upcoming minute is not promised to us. Keeping this fact in the back of my brain I decided to compile a list of things I want to accomplish, and while I accomplish them I will be sure to keep a record of all the things I did with pictures to blog about them. This is part one of a long list of other parts to come: here is the first 50.

1. write a short story
2. create a sculpture
3. be a vegetarian for a month( this one is to say I did that once)
4. Graduate high school
5. attend my high school prom ( initially I said I did not want to go, but now I must)

6. say yes to everything for a day
7. finish my bucket list
8. run a 10 k
9. do 100 push-ups in a row
10. reduce my sugar intake

11. quit drinking all forms of soda
12. learn how to bake from scratch
13. teach myself how to paint
14. teach myself photography
15. become a food critic

16. learn how to swim
17. get accepted to college
18. attend a drive-in movie with friends
19. swim with dolphins( after I learn how to swim)
20. learn CPR

21. plant a tree
22. spend a day at the local farmers market
23. get a job
24. meet a best friend(hopefully)
25. have the world’s largest water balloon fight

26. buy a meal for a homeless person
27. get my ears pierced for a second time
28. run a marathon
29. teach a child how to tie his/her shoes
30. buy a polaroid

31. learn how to eat healthy for a long period of time
32. inspire someone
33. make my own granola bars
34. go camping
35. go bowling for the first time

36. sing karaoke in front of other people
37. go indoor rock climbing
38. solve a rubik’s cube
39. write a song
40. make my own pizza

41. study abroad
42. bake a pie from scratch
43. try a hookah
44. meet someone crazy enough that will let me plan their wedding
45. visit the Grand Canyon

46. make and fly my own kite
47. get a six pack
48. take a yoga class
49. start my own business
50. learn to sew

EPIPHANY

 
pony

I have recently came to a somewhat terrifying realization these past few months, which was that I’ve been been alive for seventeen years.  Seventeen years, almost two decades and you would think that the fact that I’m getting old would resognate with me and depress me, but no sadly it has not.I’ve seem to have suddenly realize that I have absolutely no major accomplishments in my life (I’m not even a high school graduate, yet). There’s no brag worthy moments that I can rub in peoples faces by saying, “see I’ve been there, done that.”
     
With this little self conclusion,it has not made loose “my purpose in life”, it only opened my eyes to the fact that I have not gained that purpose yet, I’m sort of like a late bloomer in a way; if your were to ask me the millom dollar question that had been directed towards everyone at omg point in their life time, “what do you want to do with your life?” My honest answer would be that I have no idea. Life if long, and I certainly don’t want to make a rash decision, and feel as if I have to uphold that one decision to the point where I have to honor and carry out that one decision and spite commitment to it.( yup, I’m that kind of person).
     So I’ve decided to pave my own path into self discovery, and the best way I figure how to do that is to make an awesome bucket list of things I want and hope to accomplishe through out my lifetime. It going to be  almost like living my life through a bucket list…..
      

5 memorable quotes from 1977 miniseries Roots

roots

Roots was a powerful miniseries released in 1977 and aired on ABC, it told the story of author Alex Hayley’s descendents from slavery, through the war, and up to present generation. The first series tells the story of African born Kunta Kinte, a Mandinka warrior. Who was one day captured by slave captures in African, he then was transported to America where he was purchased to work as a field hand. Kunta Kinte, was brave and always dreamed of escaping to freedom and returning to his motherland. Below are five memorable quotes from this must watched mineseries.

1. Kunta Kinti: Chains aint right for niggers, Fiddler!

2. Kintango: We believe not in death, but in life, and there is no object more valuable than a man’s life.

3. Omoro: (holding his newborn son up to a star-filled sky) Kunta Kinte, behold the only thing greater than yourself!

4. Kunta Kinti: What’s snow, Fiddler?
Fiddler: Never you mind, boy, never you mind. Let’s get on back to home. I got enough trouble teaching you the difference between manure and massa. ‘Course there ain’t all that much difference when you gets right down to it.

5. Captain Thomas Davies: I’m a Christian Man and I command a Christian Ship! I will not lead men into sin!

Black Women With Lighter Skin Recieve “Lighter” Prison Sentences

Study Finds Black Women With Lighter Skin Recieve “Lighter” Prison Sentences BY: http://themadmanchronicles.com/2012/06/04/study-finds-black-women-with-lighter-skin-recieve-lighter-prison-sentences/

June 4, 2012 by WYMS0 Comments

in todays GTFOHWTBS news ….

Female “Reboned” criminals across the country have a reason to rejoice (Redboned is the Black vernacular for a “light-skinned person”). Not only are light-skinned women the preferred choice in bed, in the media and the workplace, now we can prove that even the bad ones are given a break.

The Social Science Journal published a report entitled “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders” .. and while their finding are not surprising, the numbers hurt.

The Sentencing Project website reports:

A recent study, “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders,” by Jill Viglione, Lance Hannon, and Robert DeFina of Villanova University assesses how perceived skin tone is related to the maximum prison sentence and time served for a sample of over 12,158 black women imprisoned in North Carolina between 1995 and 2009. The authors controlled for factors such as prior record, conviction date, prison misconduct, and being thin, as well as whether the woman was convicted of homicide or robbery since these crimes usually carry lengthy prison sentences. With regard to prison sentences, their results indicated that women deemed to have light skin are sentenced to approximately 12% less time behind bars than their darker skinned counterparts. The results also show that having light skin reduces the actual time served by approximately 11%.

The authors conclude by urging people to understand that it is not sufficient to understand racial discrimination in terms of relative advantages of whites compared to non-whites. Among blacks, characteristics associated with whiteness appear to also have a significant impact on important life outcomes.

Viglione, Jill, Lance Hannon, and Robert DeFina. 2011. “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders.” The Social Science Journal, 48:250-258.

Word? When do we get tired of this? So a Dark skinned woman has more malice when she shoplifts a loaf of bread than a light-skinned one? A Light-skinned woman who neglects her child did it “slightly less” intentionally than a darker woman brough up on the same charges?

Don’t gt me wrong Madmen, do the crime, do the time. But if we are up for the same charges, everyone should be going down the exact same way. No preferential treatment because my co-conspirator is light-skinned and I’m dark-skinned. We both steal a car and she gets probation and I get 2 to 3 in the clink? GTFOHWTBS.

The superficial nature of our society destroys so many people from the inside out. MLK said he dreamed of a country where a person could be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin. He should have dreamed a bit bigger – cause this skin color discrimination phenomenon is global.

Hear the discussion about internalized racism as a global phenominon Tuesday June 5 @ 10pm on WYMS Radio (call in number 917-889-2924). If you miss the broadcast, you can always catch it on demand at the site http://www.whyyoumadson.com, or in iTunes search term “WYMS”.

The MadMan Chronicles

in todays GTFOHWTBS news ….

Female “Reboned” criminals across the country have a reason to rejoice (Redboned is the Black vernacular for a “light-skinned person”).  Not only are light-skinned women the preferred choice in bed, in the media and the workplace, now we can prove that even the bad ones are given a break.

The Social Science Journal published a report entitled “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders” .. and while their finding are not surprising, the numbers hurt. 

 The Sentencing Project website reports:

A recent study, “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders,” by Jill Viglione, Lance Hannon, and Robert DeFina of Villanova University assesses how perceived skin tone is related to the maximum prison sentence and time served for a sample of over 12,158 black women imprisoned in North Carolina between 1995 and 2009.  The authors controlled for factors such as prior record…

View original post 330 more words

#Teamlightskin vs. #Teamdarkskin = #Teamhouseslave vs #Teamfieldhand

#Teamlightskin and #Teamdarkskin has become a meme over Facebook and twitter.

5

Black people of different shades proudly post pictures of themselves proclaiming their lightness and or darkness without realizing that this is just racist and this issue has been around since slavery time. It is a fact that the usually light-skinned people during slavery were the house slave and the dark-skinned people were the field hands.
They don’t understand that, because duh black people can’t be racist, can they? Well of course they can be. This we call colorism, light-skinned people get stereotype as being beautiful despite facial features, and all dark-skinned people are automatically ugly.This is so not true. This caste system needs to stop…

This YouTube video touches on the subject much better…

The Jezebel stereotype

The Jezebel stereotype

Thu 6 Mar 2008 by abagond

The Jezebel stereotype (1630s- ) is one of the main ways white Americans look at black women. It is why so many whites think black women are loose, immoral and oversexed.

Jezebel, named after an evil queen in the Bible, is a loose woman who wants sex all the time. She’s gotta have it. Yet at the same time she uses sex to draw men in to get what she wants. Sometimes it is money. Sometimes it is to destroy them. Many whites read Anita Hill this way. She presented herself as a good Christian woman, but white people are not fooled by that. Hip hop videos and Halle Berry’s Oscar-winning performance in “Monster’s Ball” push this image of black women. Angela Bassett refused the part in “Monster’s Ball” for just this reason.

This image of black women is not based on the latest government findings or anything like that. Nor is it even a simple misunderstanding of what black women are like. Instead it is a sick and self-serving stereotype pushed by slave-masters that has not yet died out.

Slave-masters forced black slave women to sleep with them. Deep down they knew it was wrong, that it was a crime, even if the law allowed it (it did – black women were their property). But instead of telling the truth about themselves, they chose to tell a lie about black women. Black women had no way to call them on it and even white women believed it. It has lasted down to our time, finding new life in Hollywood, starting in the 1970s with blaxpoitation films, and later with hip hop in the 1990s.

Before the 1960s the stereotype was so strong that not a single white man in the South was ever thrown in prison for raping a black woman. Not one. And even now it is a hard thing to make stick.

Before the 1960s the stereotype was so sick that white people made pictures of little black girls who talked or acted like they wanted sex. It was supposed to make you laugh.

Slave-masters gave the stereotype force and life because it covered their crimes, but it did not start with them.

When white men first came to black Africa they saw half-naked women! That part of Africa did not yet have a Christian idea of modest dress. But the whites of the time drew a different conclusion: that black women were loose and wanted sex even more than men did.

So did they? Was there any truth to it? From what slave accounts we have, the slave women who had sex with their masters did it almost always out of fear, not desire.

So the Jezebel thing was a lie.

But it proved to be a useful lie, one that has since taken on a life of its own and will take a long time to root out.

See also:
stereotype
The Jezebel Stereotype – goes much deeper than this post. It comes from the Jim Crow museum. Riveting stuff.
Stereotypes about black women
The pure white woman stereotype
Race in America
Jim Crow
hip hop
Through the ages: Sarah Baartman
Josephine Baker
So White in Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs
video vixens

Abagond

The Jezebel stereotype (1630s- ) is one of the main ways white Americans look at black women. It is why so many whites think black women are loose, immoral and oversexed.

Jezebel, named after an evil queen in the Bible, is a loose woman who wants sex all the time. She’s gotta have it. Yet at the same time she uses sex to draw men in to get what she wants. Sometimes it is money. Sometimes it is to destroy them. Many whites read Anita Hill this way. She presented herself as a good Christian woman, but white people are not fooled by that. Hip hop videos and Halle Berry’s Oscar-winning performance in “Monster’s Ball” push this image of black women. Angela Bassett refused the part in “Monster’s Ball” for just this reason.

This image of black women is not based on the latest government findings or anything…

View original post 397 more words