Black Women With Lighter Skin Recieve “Lighter” Prison Sentences

Study Finds Black Women With Lighter Skin Recieve “Lighter” Prison Sentences BY: http://themadmanchronicles.com/2012/06/04/study-finds-black-women-with-lighter-skin-recieve-lighter-prison-sentences/

June 4, 2012 by WYMS0 Comments

in todays GTFOHWTBS news ….

Female “Reboned” criminals across the country have a reason to rejoice (Redboned is the Black vernacular for a “light-skinned person”). Not only are light-skinned women the preferred choice in bed, in the media and the workplace, now we can prove that even the bad ones are given a break.

The Social Science Journal published a report entitled “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders” .. and while their finding are not surprising, the numbers hurt.

The Sentencing Project website reports:

A recent study, “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders,” by Jill Viglione, Lance Hannon, and Robert DeFina of Villanova University assesses how perceived skin tone is related to the maximum prison sentence and time served for a sample of over 12,158 black women imprisoned in North Carolina between 1995 and 2009. The authors controlled for factors such as prior record, conviction date, prison misconduct, and being thin, as well as whether the woman was convicted of homicide or robbery since these crimes usually carry lengthy prison sentences. With regard to prison sentences, their results indicated that women deemed to have light skin are sentenced to approximately 12% less time behind bars than their darker skinned counterparts. The results also show that having light skin reduces the actual time served by approximately 11%.

The authors conclude by urging people to understand that it is not sufficient to understand racial discrimination in terms of relative advantages of whites compared to non-whites. Among blacks, characteristics associated with whiteness appear to also have a significant impact on important life outcomes.

Viglione, Jill, Lance Hannon, and Robert DeFina. 2011. “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders.” The Social Science Journal, 48:250-258.

Word? When do we get tired of this? So a Dark skinned woman has more malice when she shoplifts a loaf of bread than a light-skinned one? A Light-skinned woman who neglects her child did it “slightly less” intentionally than a darker woman brough up on the same charges?

Don’t gt me wrong Madmen, do the crime, do the time. But if we are up for the same charges, everyone should be going down the exact same way. No preferential treatment because my co-conspirator is light-skinned and I’m dark-skinned. We both steal a car and she gets probation and I get 2 to 3 in the clink? GTFOHWTBS.

The superficial nature of our society destroys so many people from the inside out. MLK said he dreamed of a country where a person could be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin. He should have dreamed a bit bigger – cause this skin color discrimination phenomenon is global.

Hear the discussion about internalized racism as a global phenominon Tuesday June 5 @ 10pm on WYMS Radio (call in number 917-889-2924). If you miss the broadcast, you can always catch it on demand at the site http://www.whyyoumadson.com, or in iTunes search term “WYMS”.

The MadMan Chronicles

in todays GTFOHWTBS news ….

Female “Reboned” criminals across the country have a reason to rejoice (Redboned is the Black vernacular for a “light-skinned person”).  Not only are light-skinned women the preferred choice in bed, in the media and the workplace, now we can prove that even the bad ones are given a break.

The Social Science Journal published a report entitled “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders” .. and while their finding are not surprising, the numbers hurt. 

 The Sentencing Project website reports:

A recent study, “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders,” by Jill Viglione, Lance Hannon, and Robert DeFina of Villanova University assesses how perceived skin tone is related to the maximum prison sentence and time served for a sample of over 12,158 black women imprisoned in North Carolina between 1995 and 2009.  The authors controlled for factors such as prior record…

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#Teamlightskin vs. #Teamdarkskin = #Teamhouseslave vs #Teamfieldhand

#Teamlightskin and #Teamdarkskin has become a meme over Facebook and twitter.

5

Black people of different shades proudly post pictures of themselves proclaiming their lightness and or darkness without realizing that this is just racist and this issue has been around since slavery time. It is a fact that the usually light-skinned people during slavery were the house slave and the dark-skinned people were the field hands.
They don’t understand that, because duh black people can’t be racist, can they? Well of course they can be. This we call colorism, light-skinned people get stereotype as being beautiful despite facial features, and all dark-skinned people are automatically ugly.This is so not true. This caste system needs to stop…

This YouTube video touches on the subject much better…

The Jezebel stereotype

The Jezebel stereotype

Thu 6 Mar 2008 by abagond

The Jezebel stereotype (1630s- ) is one of the main ways white Americans look at black women. It is why so many whites think black women are loose, immoral and oversexed.

Jezebel, named after an evil queen in the Bible, is a loose woman who wants sex all the time. She’s gotta have it. Yet at the same time she uses sex to draw men in to get what she wants. Sometimes it is money. Sometimes it is to destroy them. Many whites read Anita Hill this way. She presented herself as a good Christian woman, but white people are not fooled by that. Hip hop videos and Halle Berry’s Oscar-winning performance in “Monster’s Ball” push this image of black women. Angela Bassett refused the part in “Monster’s Ball” for just this reason.

This image of black women is not based on the latest government findings or anything like that. Nor is it even a simple misunderstanding of what black women are like. Instead it is a sick and self-serving stereotype pushed by slave-masters that has not yet died out.

Slave-masters forced black slave women to sleep with them. Deep down they knew it was wrong, that it was a crime, even if the law allowed it (it did – black women were their property). But instead of telling the truth about themselves, they chose to tell a lie about black women. Black women had no way to call them on it and even white women believed it. It has lasted down to our time, finding new life in Hollywood, starting in the 1970s with blaxpoitation films, and later with hip hop in the 1990s.

Before the 1960s the stereotype was so strong that not a single white man in the South was ever thrown in prison for raping a black woman. Not one. And even now it is a hard thing to make stick.

Before the 1960s the stereotype was so sick that white people made pictures of little black girls who talked or acted like they wanted sex. It was supposed to make you laugh.

Slave-masters gave the stereotype force and life because it covered their crimes, but it did not start with them.

When white men first came to black Africa they saw half-naked women! That part of Africa did not yet have a Christian idea of modest dress. But the whites of the time drew a different conclusion: that black women were loose and wanted sex even more than men did.

So did they? Was there any truth to it? From what slave accounts we have, the slave women who had sex with their masters did it almost always out of fear, not desire.

So the Jezebel thing was a lie.

But it proved to be a useful lie, one that has since taken on a life of its own and will take a long time to root out.

See also:
stereotype
The Jezebel Stereotype – goes much deeper than this post. It comes from the Jim Crow museum. Riveting stuff.
Stereotypes about black women
The pure white woman stereotype
Race in America
Jim Crow
hip hop
Through the ages: Sarah Baartman
Josephine Baker
So White in Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs
video vixens

Abagond

The Jezebel stereotype (1630s- ) is one of the main ways white Americans look at black women. It is why so many whites think black women are loose, immoral and oversexed.

Jezebel, named after an evil queen in the Bible, is a loose woman who wants sex all the time. She’s gotta have it. Yet at the same time she uses sex to draw men in to get what she wants. Sometimes it is money. Sometimes it is to destroy them. Many whites read Anita Hill this way. She presented herself as a good Christian woman, but white people are not fooled by that. Hip hop videos and Halle Berry’s Oscar-winning performance in “Monster’s Ball” push this image of black women. Angela Bassett refused the part in “Monster’s Ball” for just this reason.

This image of black women is not based on the latest government findings or anything…

View original post 397 more words

10 Things I Want To Say To A Black Woman by Joshua Bennett

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All women are beautiful…

1. I wish I could put your voice in jar, wait for those lonely
winter nights when I forget what God sounds like, run to the
nearest maximum security prison and open it. Watch the notes
that bounce off the walls like ricocheted bullets, punching
keyholes into the sternums of every brother in the room,
skeletons opening, rose blossom beautiful to remind you that
the way to a black man’s heart is not through his stomach, it is
through the heaven in your ‘hello’; the echo of unborn galaxies
that pounces forth from your vocal cords, that melts ice grills
into oceans, baptizing our lips, and so harsh words fade from
our memories, and we forget why we stopped calling you
divine in the first place.

2. When I was born my mother’s smile was so bright, it knocked
the air from my lungs, and I haven’t been able to breathe right
since. It’s something about the way light dances off your
teeth, the way the moon gets jealous when you mock her
crescent figure with the shape of your mouth. Queen, you
make the sky insecure, self-conscious for being forced to
stare at your face every morning and realize that the blues of
her skin was painted by that symphony doing cartwheels on
your tongue.

3. Who else can make kings out of bastards, turn a fatherless
Christmas into a floor full of gifts and a kitchen that smells like
the Lord is coming tomorrow, and we must eat well tonight. I
used to think my sister was a blacksmith, the way she baked
fire and metal and made kitchen miracles at fourteen, making
enough food to feed a little boy who didn’t have the words to
say how much she meant to him back then, or enough backbone
to say so the day he turned twenty.

4. Your skin reminds me of everything beautiful I have ever
known: the colour of ink on a page, the earth we walk on and
the cross that hung my Saviour.

5. I’ve seen you crucified too, spread out on billboards to be
spiritually impaled by millions of men with eyes like nails, who
made mothers of your daughters; so I’m sorry for the music
deals, for Justin Timberlake at the Superbowl, and that young
man on the corner this morning, who made you undershade your
flesh and become invisible. Never doubt, he only insults you
because, men are confused. Now we are trained to destroy or
conquer everything we see from birth.

6. If I ever see Don Imus in public I will punch him in the face,
one time for every member of the Rutgers and Tennessee
Women Basketball Teams. Then I’ll show him a picture of
Phylicia Rashad, Assata Shakur, Arthur Kit, my mother, my
grandmother and my seven-year-old niece, who’s got eyes like
firebombs, and then dare him to tell me that black women are
only beautiful in one shade of skin.

7. You are like a sunrise in a nation at war; you remind people
that there is always something worth waiting up to.

8. When we are married I will cook, do the dishes and whatever
else it takes to let you know that traditional gender roles have
no place in the home we build; so my last name is an option,
babysitting the kids a treat we split equally, and our bed will be
an ancient temple where I construct altars of wax on the small
of your back. We make love like the sky is falling, moving to the
rhythm of bedsprings and Bell Biv DeVoe. Angels applauding in
unison, saying this is the way it was meant to be.

9. My daughter will know her father’s face from the day she is
born, and I can only pray that the superman complex lasts long
enough for me deflect the pain this world will aim at her from
the moment she is old enough to realize that the colour brown
is still not considered human most places. But my daughter will
have a smile like a wheelchair, and so even when I am at my
worst, when the Kryptonite of this putrid planet threatens to
render me grounded, the light dancing off of her teeth, will
transform the shards of my broken body into heart-shaped
blackbirds, taking flight on a wing that reminds me of my
Saviour’s hands, my daughter’s smile, my mother’s laugh when I
was in her womb.

10. Never stop pushing, this world needs you now more than
ever…

here’s a link to the video..

Haiti’s Silenced Victims

Haiti’s Silenced Victims

December 12, 2012

An article from the New York Times discusses archaic treatment of rape victims in Haiti. The article says:

For decades, Haitian victims were blamed for inviting rape, and seldom spoke out. Politicians and the media perpetuated these stigmas. So did the law: a woman’s testimony that she didn’t consent to sex was insufficient for conviction, and monetary restitution or marriage to the rapist was considered a solution. A 2005 law made rape a punishable offense after intense lobbying from survivors and the Haitian Ministry of Women’s Affairs. In 2010, the law was updated after chilling reports of rapes committed against the elderly and children.

But old habits die hard. In Haiti, attitudes toward rape are similar to those that were common in the United States before the 1970s and ’80s. Haitian officials often claim that residents of slums and displaced person camps are promiscuous. Despite new laws, few women will ever report the event because of the prevailing social norms that blame victims for their own assault. Even fewer survivors will be in a position to navigate the complicated procedures to bring charges against a rapist.

Here is the article:

Opinion

Haiti’s Silenced Victims

By ATHENA KOLBE and ROBERT MUGGAH

Published December 8, 2012

A TEXT MESSAGE was the first sign that something was wrong. In the week after Hurricane Sandy hit Haiti, our research team was assessing post-disaster crime, food security and service provision. The message came from a Haitian researcher in our group, an enthusiastic and talented graduate student whom we’ll call Wendy. She had been walking alone a few blocks from our hotel when she was forced into a house and brutally raped.

We quickly located a doctor but he refused to examine Wendy, saying she needed to be seen by the authorities first. We then contacted the police, and after a grueling interview in which one officer repeatedly asked Wendy, “What did you do to make him violate you?” the police said she was free to be examined. The doctor, however, couldn’t be found.

Although Haiti routinely suffers from political and natural disasters, rape is an especially insidious crisis. Haiti’s brutal dictatorships used rape as a political tool to undermine the opposition. A 2006 study reported that some 35,000 women and girls in Port-au-Prince were sexually assaulted in a single year. In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake, residents of the capital’s tent cities were 20 times more likely to report a sexual assault than other Haitians.

Haitian prosecutors are reluctant to pursue charges against rapists unless a victim is examined by a doctor within the first 72 hours to “certify” the assault, but few victims are able to satisfy this requirement. The police referred Wendy to a state-run clinic in the nearest large town, a three-hour drive over washed-out roads. When Wendy arrived she was told the doctor was out. A nurse mentioned that he could be found at a private clinic nearby.

It had been more than 16 hours since the attack. Wendy hadn’t slept or bathed. Her clothes were ripped and dirty. Dried blood matted her hair where the rapist had slammed her head against a wall. The doctor wanted verification from the police that a sexual assault complaint had been filed before he conducted an examination to retrieve fluids left by the perpetrator. The police were called but they claimed a “fee” was required before they would release a copy of the sexual assault complaint.

A women’s rights organization in the capital suggested we pay a bribe and complain to the policeman’s superiors later. Our colleague drove several hours back to the town where the assault had taken place, paid a $25 bribe, and waited while the officer wrote up a report that merely stated that Wendy had lodged a complaint against a particular man but not that she had been raped by him. After some argument, the officer agreed to include the allegation of sexual assault.

It took more than 24 hours before Wendy finally saw a doctor who admitted he’d never been trained to examine a rape victim. She cried the entire time. Random individuals wandered freely in and out of the room during the exam, including patients, nurses and a man visiting his sick wife in an adjacent bed.

In North America, rape victims are often given medication to fight possible exposure to sexually transmitted disease as well as the morning-after pill. Wendy was terrified of pregnancy. She declared that although she didn’t believe in abortion, she would rather “die” than have “that man put a baby inside of me.” Wendy knew about the morning-after pill but wasn’t aware if it was available or legal in Haiti. The doctor falsely told her that after 24 hours it was too late to use it.

After Wendy’s exam, the police refused to pick up the medical report or fluid samples collected by the doctor. Instead, she was told to take them to a state-run medical clinic for sexual assault victims in the capital, a 15-hour drive away. The doctor then demanded an exorbitant fee for the medical report. The final document stated simply that Wendy had complained of being raped and was found to have evidence of sexual activity. No record was made of the bruises covering her thighs or the many lacerations on her body.

BEFORE Wendy could shower, she had to return to the small town where the assault occurred for yet another interrogation by the police. Our colleague, meanwhile, was scouring pharmacies for the morning-after pill. He finally tracked down a pharmacist who knew what it was. But the medication, like most pharmaceuticals in Haiti, was imported. The instructions were in Arabic and Portuguese, neither of which the pharmacist could read. He didn’t know which package contained the morning-after pill and which contained hormones taken by post-menopausal women. Nor did our colleague, who closed his eyes and picked a box, which by chance happened to be the right one. After taking the pill, Wendy slept for the entire ride to Port-au-Prince, helped into oblivion by the glass of homemade gin the doctor had prescribed.

We had no intention of sweeping this incident under the rug. We contacted the police, women’s rights organizations and various government ministries. We spoke with the police chief from the area where the assault had taken place. He said he had questioned the perpetrator, who claimed that Wendy had had sex with him willingly. Because the medical report made no mention of violent assault, the police officer in charge, who had seen her bruises and cuts himself, said there was nothing he could do.

Calls to the women’s rights organizations and other civil society groups confirmed that there was little to be done. “You could pay something, give them a gift so they arrest the guy,” one human rights worker suggested. “But he’ll probably just pay another bribe and get out.”

For decades, Haitian victims were blamed for inviting rape, and seldom spoke out. Politicians and the media perpetuated these stigmas. So did the law: a woman’s testimony that she didn’t consent to sex was insufficient for conviction, and monetary restitution or marriage to the rapist was considered a solution. A 2005 law made rape a punishable offense after intense lobbying from survivors and the Haitian Ministry of Women’s Affairs. In 2010, the law was updated after chilling reports of rapes committed against the elderly and children.

But old habits die hard. In Haiti, attitudes toward rape are similar to those that were common in the United States before the 1970s and ’80s. Haitian officials often claim that residents of slums and displaced person camps are promiscuous. Despite new laws, few women will ever report the event because of the prevailing social norms that blame victims for their own assault. Even fewer survivors will be in a position to navigate the complicated procedures to bring charges against a rapist.

Having an education, money and connections doesn’t necessarily help. By the time Wendy returned to Port-au-Prince she wanted only to return to her family. Her mother thanked us for getting her medical attention and asked that we never mention the rape to Wendy again. Wendy said she just wanted to forget about it.

She blamed herself for walking alone, for wearing borrowed pants that were too tight, for smiling and saying hello when the man first approached her, for freezing up and not screaming when he attacked her. Despite her education, resilience and dedication to fighting violence against women, Wendy could not bring herself to face the grueling road of rape prosecution in Haiti.

So she dropped it and asked us to do the same. When we told the women’s rights group she didn’t want to pursue a case, they weren’t surprised. “It happens all the time,” said a member of the staff. “We get dozens of cases each month, and out of those sometimes not even one woman will put herself through this process.” It is hard to blame them

Athena Kolbe is a researcher from the University of Michigan School of Social Work and co-director of a social work institute in Pétionville, Haiti. Robert Muggah is the research director of Brazil’s Igarapé Institute and a professor of International Relations at the Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro

6 stereotype of men

vb

1.all they want is sex
so maybe men think about sex throughout more than women do, but that does not make them mean-lean sex machines

2. Men become Doctors not nurses even since the civil war, women have dominated the field of nursing, it may shock some people when a guy aspire to be a nurse, but it is awesome especially if he is super handsome.

3.all men are good at math so they are more likely to be technical fields

4. men don’t cook, clean or do laundry-– men who can cook, instantly become more attractive and mothers are actually teaching their sons to cook more nowadays. And if you watched the food network, you know they have a lot of guy chefs.

5. men are always in control and in charge– this one depends on the type of guy, maybe he likes to let his companion take charge and he like to watch.

and of course..the big one
6. ALL MEN ARE CHEATERS..
this one kills me and all women out there who believes in a somewhat fairytale love. It extinguish our hopes, and lead us to believe that if the men that they are with cheats on them, they should stay with that person cause the next guy is no better cause he’s a cheater too. This is so not true!

Malala Yousafzai – A Symbol Of Courage

THE VIBE 101

According to Jimi Hendrix, “When the power of LOVE overcomes the love of POWER, the world will know PEACE.” – such humble words underpinning a compelling, hopeful message. Words, no matter how simple, can speak volumes. Words can inspire. Words can be the catalyst for change.

This brings me to the story of Malala Yousafzai, a 14 year old Pakistani girl, described as a peace activist, who was shot in the head by Taliban extremists, merely for fighting for what should be every child’s right – to be educated.

Since 2007, Malala’s hometown of Swat has been infiltrated by the Taliban regime, which has set about imposing their will on residents through the use of fear and intimidation1. Under Taliban rule, “men have been forced to grow beards, opponents of their beliefs are beheaded and women are prevented from going to the market”2. Furthermore, “schools have…

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